help

Choose a template type

Cards

A
B

How to use the templates

Related articles

Set Up Boxes

A
B
C

Game boards

A
B

How to use the templates

Related articles

Player Mats

A
B
C

Tuckboxes

A
C
B

Magnetic Boxes

A
B
C

Help

What do the lines in the templates mean?

Cut and folding lines

These are the main lines that define the shape that the final printed item will have. Some of them define where the paper will be cut, while others define where the paper will fold. The areas inside this lines contain the main graphic content. If you have doubts about what each area represents, refer to the point below "how to interpret the templates".

Margin lines

All important content should be placed within margin lines. This is to avoid that during the printing and assembly process, and due to small displacements of the artwork, important texts or images end being cut or misplaced.

Bleed lines

Bleed is there to make sure that after printing, when the papers are being cut, there is enough artwork printed that extends to the edge of the page. A very minimal amount of movement may occur when printing with a press and when cutting the paper to the desired size. Thus, if your artwork is made to fit exactly and the press moves a millimeter, then the whole art- work moves 1 mm in a given direction. Then, when we start cutting, part of the paper won’t have any artwork, and the other part will have the artwork cut off partially.

Game board folding lines

Game boards are usually folded so they can fit in boxes smaller than their full size. This lines indicate where the folds will occur on your artwork.

How to interpret the templates

Below you can find some annex pdf files that might help you interpreting and using the templates along with your artwork.

How to use the templates

COMING SOON